Program Details

Cambridge

Program Arrive Program Ends Vacate Housing
Cambridge Spring 2021 06 January 2021 23 April 2021 24 April 2021
Cambridge Fall 2021 25 August 2021 10 December 2021 11 December 2021

Spend a semester at INSTEP-WFU Cambridge being taught by world class faculty from the University of Cambridge while discovering all that Cambridge has to offer academically and socially. The INSTEP-WFU Cambridge Program is designed to provide small interactive courses following the Cambridge model of small supervisions or seminars. You can study topics that include International Relations, Business, Economics, Political Economy, Geopolitics, History and English Literature.

Fall Semester 2020

During the first four weeks of the semester all students will take the course 'The Political Economy of the European Union' (3 credits). For the final eleven weeks of the semester, students choose four additional courses (12 credits for a total of 15 credits for the semester) across the INSTEP-WFU offerings to provide a cross-disciplinary and Western European approach to the topics.

Spring Semester 2021

During the first eleven weeks of the semester, students choose four courses (12 credits) across the INSTEP-WFU offerings to provide a cross-disciplinary and Western European approach to the topics. During the final four weeks of the semester, students will complete one course chosen from 'Seminar in Global Trade and Commerce' or 'Christian History' (3 credits for a total of 15 credits for the semester).


This course examines the origins and evolution of the European Union since its inception with particular reference to structural changes since the end of the Cold War. The impact of the Single European Act (SEA) and the Maastricht, Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon treaties will be assessed in relation to the tension between supra- national and intergovernmental perspectives. The question of whether Europe is likely to become a fully-fledged federation, a confederation, or something else lies at the heart of the debate arising from the current fiscal crisis and the European Union’s response to it. Are we seeing the renationalisation of policy and the rejection of supra-nationalism by European states engaged in the operation of the Euro-zone?

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The course explains American geopolitics in the twenty first century in light of American History. This is very much an introductory course—of eleven lectures and seminars—that emphasises themes rather than specific events. The lectures cover the evolution of American geopolitics from 1660 to the present day. The seminars provide time to discuss a combination of texts and primary sources, including official documents and public treatises. The course is conceptually structured around ‘grand strategy’ and ‘geopolitics’ in a way that will make it of interest to those who have a background in any period of the history of modern international relations. The aim is to teach students to think strategically about America’s role in the Western Hemisphere as well as the world.

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This course will provide a set of eleven lectures on the comparative analysis of the BRICS countries and their relationship to advanced income economies as well as to other emerging economies. The aim of the lecture series is not to provide comprehensive country reports but aim to identify connections between countries on a range of different sets of issues. The initial lectures will provide an examination of the concepts behind the BRICS, and how these relate to notions of emerging economies. The lectures will then move on to a discussion of economic performance of BRICS themselves and differences within these countries in relation to terms of histories, cultures, and politics of the nation state. There will be a focus on a range of economic and development features where the particularities of state policy and economic orientation affect macroeconomic policy as well as poverty and social justice issues.

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This course is taught through the medium of interactive group supervisions. The content is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to investment and financial decision- making from a borrower’s and investor’s viewpoint. It will therefore cover selected aspects of corporate finance and investment management. Content will incorporate technical elements (including the time value of money, modern portfolio theory and capital assets pricing model (CAPM)) as well as important behavioural facets of financial markets.

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This course on money, monetary policy and financial institutions will examine the role of money in the macroeconomy with particular reference to recent UK and US experience. Topics covered will include: the transmission mechanism of monetary policy; theories of the demand for money; empirical evidence on the role of money in the economy; and money supply and its determinants. The course will be amply illustrated from the practice of monetary policy in the UK and USA in recent years. Here attention will focus on the rise and fall of monetarism in the UK; changes in British banking; the effects of financial innovation on monetary policy; recent financial crises; and prospects for the future. Attention will be drawn to the significance of the institutional context for the theory and practice of monetary policy.

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LThis course brings to life a number of key economic concepts, by setting them in the historical context which inspired their creators while they worked at Cambridge; and by exploring their continuing relevance to some of the major economic questions of today. – from the optimal size of national (private and public) debt, to stabilisation policy, to the exchange rate regime international financial architecture, to the nature and purpose of economic development.

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LThis course aims to provide students with the opportunity to explore a number of topical issues and current debates in the international economy. Since the onset of the global financial crisis many of these issues have moved centre stage in discussions of national and global macro-economic policy. The course is not a text-book course but rather aims to show students how basic economic analysis can be used to address and analyse important issues in macroeconomic policy. For each topic the course material is structured to acquaint students with the relevant economic theory, empirical evidence and implications for government policy. Knowledge of basic macro and micro-economics is advantageous for those taking this course. Detailed reading will be given prior to the sessions.

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This course is concerned with the fundamental elements of the capitalism and how these are related to modern democratic systems. Particular attention is paid to the questions of stability and instability, especially the financial crisis that began in 2007.

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This course will explore the nature of Atlanticism and ask whether it was a response to a unique set of economic, political and security circumstances which are now in the process of decline. The course will examine European and American approaches to collective security and international organisation, the breakdown of the international economy between the wars, Europe, the USA and the drift to war, the collapse of the European balance of power and the onset of the Cold War. The Atlanticist order including Bretton Woods, the Marshall Plan and the Atlantic Treaty will be considered as well as US attitudes towards decolonisation and US and European integration. Lastly consideration will be given to the emergence, since the 1960’s, of tensions with the breakdown of the post war economic order, US unilateralism, European autonomy and the post 9.11 world and its implications.

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The purpose of the course is to work closely with the texts of some key modern authors and to explore the ways in which the formal innovations of their writing may be related to developments in cultural history. Arguments about history, sexuality, language, politics and economics may be traced, in varying proportions, in both the matter and the manner of construction of all the specified texts, which have been chosen in order to demonstrate a characteristic variety of artistic and political outlooks.

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Plays under consideration will be: Twelfth Night, Henry V, Macbeth, Coriolanus, King Lear and The Winter’s Tale

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This course looks at the institutional developments of Christianity in the context of the historical background and focuses on transforming society.

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This course provides foundational knowledge in global trade and commerce. It is intentionally rather eclectic as we try and discern how current issues have an impact upon economic systems; what problems are occurring in emerging economies as they grapple with development; and what does the future hold for future economic growth in the US. Trade issues are very much in the news at the moment and we will endeavor to examine them fully. Following an analysis of the various facets of capitalist development in the first industrial societies we ponder whether such a path can be followed by emerging economies. We look at the important role played by international trade and then focus on environmental, institutional, cultural, political, economic, legal, ethical, financial, competitive, and labor issues associated with commerce. We consider the relevance of the state as a regulator of institutions that undergird the overall system and examine Denmark as a country that clearly focuses upon an alternative set of priorities. Similarly, in discussing VW’s recent problems we analyse the German system of managed capitalism. By its very nature the course pursues a strong international (and historical) focus so come prepared to be exposed to and challenged by alternative ways of viewing capitalism.

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