Program Details

London

Program Arrive Program Ends Vacate Housing
London Spring 2021 06 January 2021 23 April 2021 24 April 2021
London Fall 2021 25 August 2021 10 December 2021 11 December 2021

Spend a semester at INSTEP London being taught by world class faculty drawn from various campuses of the University of London while discovering all that London has to offer academically and socially. The INSTEP London Program is designed to provide small interactive courses following the British model of small supervisions or seminars. You can study topics that include Business, Communications, Political Science and Law. During the Fall semester INSTEP-WFU offers a courses only option while during the Spring semester INSTEP-WFU offers a wider range of courses with an internship option.

Spring Semester 2021

The spring semester allows students to choose between the business track and the general track. Students who choose to follow the business track will have a required internship as part of their experience and will earn a total of 12 credit hours. Students who choose to follow the general track will have the option to participate in an internship and will earn 12-15 credit hours.

Business Track:

First 5 weeks:
* Managerial Accounting (ACC 221)
* Contemporary Ethics (POL 252)
Final 10 weeks (Internship Phase):
* Management Information Systems (BEM 251)
* Internship
* Contemporary Britain and Europe: Politics, Economics and Business

General Track:

First 5 weeks. Choose 2 of 3 courses below:
* Managerial Accounting (ACC 221)
* Contemporary Ethics (POL 252)
* The New Security Agenda (POL 256)
Final 10 weeks WITH INTERNSHIP:
* Internship
* Contemporary Britain and Europe: Politics, Economics and Business (INS 229/BUS 350)
* One or Two courses from remaining INSTEP courses
Final 10 weeks WITHOUT INTERNSHIP:
* Three courses from the offered INSTEP courses

Fall Semester 2021

During the first four weeks of the semester all students will take the course 'Contemporary Britain and Europe: Politics, Economics and Business' (3 credits). For the final eleven weeks of the semester, students choose four additional courses (12 credits for a total of 15 credits for the semester) across the INSTEP offerings to provide a cross-disciplinary and Western European approach to the topics.


Britain is at a crucial juncture in its history. Brexit – the decision to leave the European Union – is leading many to question the United Kingdom’s entire political, social and economic relationship with Europe as a whole. This course critically examines the origins and evolution of the complex relationship between Britain and the European Union.

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This course traces the evolution of the politics and international relations of Europe in the post-Cold War world. It seeks to address the question of whether there is one Europe or many by focusing on the issues of European politics and identity and Europe’s role internationally. It evaluates the causes and effects of the collapse of communism and the process of political and economic transition in Eastern Europe. Europe’s post-1989 wars in the former Yugoslavia are examined in the context of Europe’s institutional order as are the emergence of a series of sub-regional groupings within the European political system. The course then focuses on threats to pan-European security and the institutions and state alignments with which these threat can be met. The role of the European Union is a vital one and the course highlights the particular nature of the role the European Union plays in the evolution of contemporary Europe. Lastly, the course assesses the impact of Europe’s external relations on its international standing and the possibility of the creation of a single ‘European voice’.

Course Syllabus Meet The Faculty

This course is an introduction to Security Studies, a branch of International Relations that dates back to the beginning of the Cold War. During the Cold War, the security environment was dominated by the Superpower struggle between the US and USSR and the focus was on nuclear deterrence, the arms race, national liberation struggles and Superpower involvement in proxy wars in the Third World. Since the end of the Cold War and the rise of globalization, the strategic agenda has changed considerably. The traditional focus on peace and war between states has been broadened to include the threats to international peace and security deriving from conflicts within states, from transnational actors – such as terrorist groups, insurgents and criminal organizations – and from environmental factors. It also embraces a more inclusive understanding of security that includes individual and societal freedom in terms of human rights and development. While the state remains the most important actor in the contemporary international security environment, it is facing new security threats such as weapons proliferation, international terrorism and migration. The course explores how contemporary states have met these challenges and if they have been successful in preserving their citizens’ security.

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The course covers the basic elements of Middle East history and politics with special emphasis on political Islam. It begins with a broad introduction to the main features of the region and the historical background to the twentieth century. The contemporary period is then analysed in greater detail by focusing on the rise of the state system, the establishment of Israel, the emergence and discrediting of Arab nationalism, and the post-Cold War Middle East. All these twentieth century developments are examined for their own sake but also because of their contribution to the rise of political Islam, which is studied in the second part of the course. It will elaborate on political Islam as ideology and its ambiguous relationship with the nation-state, democracy and human rights and violence. The course will attempt to link the study of Islam and the Middle East with the events on and after September 11th and the Arab uprisings of 2011 in an in-depth manner.

Course Syllabus Meet The Faculty

The purpose of this supervision is to illustrate how history, philosophy, business, politics and culture interact in contemporary ethical debates on a range of public policy issues. Though this is not a course on current affairs, the supervision will necessarily include discussion of international, American and British affairs in order to analyse their broader ethical significance. Students will thus be expected to keep up with recent developments in Britain and around the world by regularly consulting newspapers and other media reporting. Discussion topics range from fundamental issues such as human rights, religious freedom and national security through to some of the ethical problems that have developed more recently, including genetic and medical research, globalization and corporate power, and environmental crisis.

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This course provides a general introduction to the sources of law of the English and Welsh legal system and how that law is implemented and enforced. It starts with a general outline of the various sources that the United Kingdom draws upon for its law, which will then be discussed in more detail throughout the course. It then examines the relationship that exists between the three institutions that make up the constitution of the United Kingdom, the executive, the legislature and the judiciary, and their respective parts in the law-making process. The course then covers how legislation is created through Parliament and the political process which led to the enactment of the Human Rights Act, and the effect the Act has had on the traditional relationship between Parliament and the Courts. The course then outlines the role of the courts and the court structure and the methods the judiciary use to interpret legislation through the courts. Judicial law-making is then discussed through the development of the common law and how judges create law through case law and the system of precedent. The course then focuses on the area of judicial review, which is the means by which the courts control the exercise of governmental power and the conflict this creates between the executive and the judiciary. Finally the course focuses on the European Community and Union and how community law is incorporated into United Kingdom law as well as the impact of Brexit.

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Much hype surrounds the media: their liberating and empowering potential, their educational role and their responsibility for true public deliberation, their overwhelming presence in our lives and their irresistible seductiveness. Yet, at the same time, suspicion and criticism of the media are growing. Television is often accused of “dumbing down” culture, of offering nothing but poor entertainment, escapism and diversion, rather than creating a meaningful, critical public debate. Global media corporations are depicted as the new missionaries of capitalism and cultural imperialism, promoting commercial values while denigrating journalism and culture. The Internet is said to increase levels of loneliness and erode any sense of community. Facebook and other social media platforms are said to have blurred traditional boundaries between public and private and create new forms of sociability. The global coverage of suffering is seen to create “compassion fatigue” and alienation. The media are sexist, we are told. And so on and so forth. In short, the media have a pervasive social presence that deserves close scrutiny, and media literacy is now as significant as traditional literacy. The goal of the proposed course is to offer theoretical tools for thinking critically about the media, by analysing its relationship with social, cultural, historical, political and economic processes and structures. It will examine the centrality, power and influence of media as institutions, industries, representations and technologies. The course will examine key theoretical debates concerning media and communications: Frankfurt School’s critique of the “culture industries” and its implications for media power, the role of the media in the creation and sustainment of a public sphere, the implications of social media for personal and social life, gender and the media, and the ethical and moral impact of the media in today’s culture and society.

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The syllabus and content of Applied International Business reflects its emphasis on the analysis of the modes of international business as strategic means to attain the business objectives of the firm: merchandise trade, services trade, international production and various forms of collaborative arrangements. The course explores theoretical and empirical determinants of each of the various modes of international business, along with the role of government policies affecting trade and international production.

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In ACC 111, students learn to construct, read, interpret and analyze the four general-purpose financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, statement of retained earnings, and statement of cash flows) used by current and potential investors and lenders to understand and evaluate a business. The focus of ACC 111 is on preparing and interpreting information primarily for users that are external to the business. In ACC 221, students will build a tool kit of skills enabling them to identify, analyze and improve the revenue, cost and profit drivers within a business. Fundamental accounting mechanics covered in ACC 111 will be applied and utilized. However, the emphasis is on learning and applying various tools used to provide information to the internal decision makers in a business. In summary, ACC 221 will focus on information needed by company management to operate and improve the business.

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Introduction to the business issues associated with information systems, designed to provide a broad perspective for utilizing and managing an organization's information resources. Frameworks are presented for understanding the placement and relationship of different types of information systems within an organization. Includes an overview of computing technology currently used in business organizations, techniques for developing and implementing information systems, advanced applications of information technology, and the strategic implications of information systems and technology for business.

Course Syllabus Meet The Faculty